14 July 2017

National Geographic Russia in July

In the July issue of National Geographic Russia:

Outcasts: In sub-Saharan Africa, having blond hair and ivory-colored skin spell trouble local medicine men claim that potions, powders, and amulets made from fragments of albinos bodies bring wealth and success.

Hummingbirds Living Helicopters: If a hummingbird were the size of a human, it would have to consume one can of soda every minute to hover in midair and accelerate to speeds approaching 90 km/h. To accomplish these feats, this featherweight wonder has developed the fastest metabolism of all the worlds vertebrates. NG used modern ultra-high speed cameras to reveal the secrets of hummingbird flight in a series of stunning photos.

Why Do We Lie? The ability to lie is as inherent to human character as the need to trust one another. That is what makes it so difficult for us to recognize when someone is lying. Why, then, do people lie?

The Last Death-Defying Honey Hunter: Nepalese resident Mauli Dhan risks his life to collect honey from the mountain hives of wild bees. The Kulung people of Eastern Nepal have used wild honey as a medicinal treatment for centuries. They also trade it on the Asian black market where it fetches a very high price due to its psychotropic properties.

Svetlana Antonova – National Geographic marketing and PR director
See also
Cosmopolitan Held Lovers Party
Cosmopolitan Held Lovers Party
The VDNKh skating rink became a land for lovers.
Harpers Bazaar in March
Harpers Bazaar in March
Issue features actress Emilia Clarke.
Popular Mechanics in March
Popular Mechanics in March
Cover story giant walking anti-robots.
Cosmopolitan Shopping on the Air
Cosmopolitan Shopping on the Air
Chief Editor Tatiana Maximova appeared on Strana FM radio.

   
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