07 February 2017

National Geographic Russia in February

In the January issue of National Geographic Russia:

Small Wild Cats: Thirty-one species of felines are collectively known as small cats, including the tiger cat, serval, jaguarondi, and the fishing cat. Most people know very little about them, but these unmatched predators are ready to latch their claws onto any jackal. Where do they live, how do they hunt, and to what lengths would they go to protect their offspring?

The Widows Share: In many parts of the world, a woman who has lost her husband becomes a pariah. How can widows in those countries avoid losing their homes, land, and children? National Geographic journalists travelled to India, Uganda, and Bosnia and Herzegovina to learn the answer.

A Swimming Hole for Wolves: How do adult wolves teach their cubs how to interact with other members of the pack and what to do in the event of even minor problems? A photographer from Astrakhan found out by observing these animals in the wild for three years.

Lake Balkhash: The number of pelican nests has fallen and the water level of the lake is dropping fast. If Balkhash dries up, southeastern Kazakhstans entire river system will be ruined, dust storms will increase, and glaciers will melt. Can the lake avoid an ecological disaster?

The magazine is already on sale. An interactive version for the iPad is also available.

Svetlana Antonova – National Geographic marketing and PR director
See also
Popular Mechanics in April
Popular Mechanics in April
Cover story: aviation of the future.
Domashny Ochag in April
Domashny Ochag in April
In this issue how to stay young at any age.
Independent Media to Hold Digital Breakfast for Business Partners
Cosmopolitan in April
Cosmopolitan in April
Issue devoted to beauty.

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